Determining your location... | View access restrictions

About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy

Avicenna and his canon: an illustrated edition from 1595 in the Bernard Becker Medical Library

Fig 1: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 1: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 2: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 2: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 3: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 3: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 4: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 4: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 5: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 5: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 6: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
Fig 6: spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Avicenna's Canon
1 of 1

This beautiful series of woodcuts (Figure 1-6) shows Avicenna’s recommended spinal manipulations for dislocation of the vertebrae. Figures 4-6 are forms of traction.  Traction is still a treatment for dislocation of the vertebrae.  I found them a few weeks ago in a Latin edition of Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine published by Giunta  family (Juntas) in Venice in 1595.  Avicenna discusses signs, symptoms, and treatments for dislocations in his 4th book, fen 5, tract 1.  In thirty short chapters, Avicenna covers dislocations from head to toe or mandible to heel.  Dislocation of the vertebrae is toward the end in Chapter 21-22. 

Avicenna in 16th century clothesAvicenna (Figure 7) is the Latinized name for Ibn Sina, a Persian polymath, renowned as a poet, scientist, and philosopher (Stedman 1982, 146). He was born in 980 in Afshana, now in Uzbekistan, and died in 1037 in Hamadan, Iran.  He compiled his encyclopedia of medicine called “ Qanun fi al- Tibb or  Canon of Medicine in the 11th century in Hamadan, Iran. In the west, it was used as a medical textbook in the west through the 16th century   (Aciduman A 2009 Jan).  Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine is still cited frequently in the current medical literature. 

While the woodcuts are new to me, I found out more about them in the online Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009 article by Aciduman, Er, and Balen, and a 2006 article by Belen and Aciduman.  From Aciduman 2009 on peripheral nerve disorders in the Canon, I learned that woodcuts in Fig 1-6 appeared first in Giunta’s 1544 edition of the Canon (Aciduman A 2009 Jan, 173, Figure 2). The article also gives useful background on how  Avicenna organized his encyclopedia and its translation into Latin by Gerard of Cremona in the 12th century   From the online Encyclopedia Britannica, I learned that the 1556 Giunta edition has identical woodcuts  because they are illustrations to the Encylopedia Britannica's brief article on Avicenna ( Avicenna’s recommended spinal manipulations, 1556 edition, The Canon of Medicine, Photograph, from "Avicenna, " Encylopedia britannica online).

The 2006 article by Belen and Aciduman on Haly Abbas and spinal traumas explains figure 6 as as a form of traction.  Belen and Aciduaman's caption for Figure 6 is as follows: "Drawing excerpted from Canon of Medicine by Avicenna (AD 980–1037) showing the correction procedure involved in treating traumatic kyphosis (by using a board), which was originally described by Hippocrates and  is also mentioned in The Royal Book." (Belen & Aciduman 2006). 

Bibliography

" Avicenna’s recommended spinal manipulations, 1556 edition, The Canon of Medicine, Photograph, from Avicenna." In Encyclopædia Britannica Online, accessed January 29, 2015, . n.d.

Aciduman A, Er U, Belen D. "Peripheral nerve disorders and treatment strategies according to Avicenna in his medical treatise, Canon of medicine." Neurosurgery 64, no. 1 (2009 Jan): 172-7.

Belen D, Aciduman A, "Historical vignette: A pioneer from the Islamic Golden Age: Haly Abbas and spinal traumas in his principal work, The Royal Book," Journal of Neurosurgery Spine 5 (2006):381–383 & Figure 1

Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Stedman's Medical dictionary. Baltimore/London: Williams & Wilkins, 1982.

* Please note: Becker Briefs pages may contain links, email addresses or information about resources which are no longer current.