Determining your location... | View access restrictions

About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy
A Barnes Hospital pantry maid, c. 1950s.

A Hospital Food Revolution

Marian Sizelove and Joyce Gibbons, dieticians at Barnes Hospital, wrote in 1949 that “One of the age old complaints of hospital patients is that the hot foods [they are served] are not hot an

A History of The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis Now on Display

Over 100 years of history are now on display on the seventh floor of Bernard Becker Medical Library.

Traces of the Past: Archival Research on an “Angel of Bataan”

One of my favorite parts of my job as a project archivist at Becker Medical Library is discovering individuals’ stories from the past.
Clover Ball guests in 1967

The Clover Ball: A 30-Year Tradition

"A fairyland with hundreds of pale pink blossoms and twinkling lights,” raved the St. Louis Globe-Democrat in January 1962, describing the transformation of the Hotel Chase’s Khorassan Room for the first Jewish Hospital Auxiliary Clover Ball.
Waiting area in the Hospital's Outpatient Department, c.1890's.

Fireworks, Jelly, and a Feather Duster: Early Gifts to St. Louis Children's Hospital

In 1880, a year after St. Louis Children’s Hospital’s opening; the newly minted hospital published its first annual report. In addition to a list of hospital officers and a report of the hospital Board of Managers, the 1879-1880 annual report included a list of the various donors and donations given to the new hospital. Monetary donations are listed alongside gifts of items such as blankets, pillows, and cribs. These usual donations are interspaced with eclectic items that the people of St. Louis gifted to their new children’s hospital.
Men at the Bar of Cicardi's Resturant, 1914. Missouri History Museum collection.

Too Many Cooks Spoil the Broth: Applicants for the Position of Barnes Hospital Chef

In the months leading up to Barnes Hospital’s opening, L.C. Smith, the hospital superintendent, was kept busy fielding letters from job seekers. People throughout the region had heard of the “great institution” that had been built on Kingshighway, and knew that the large, new hospital would soon be in need of housekeepers, laundry workers, stenographers, and orderlies to keep it running. Amidst the pile of applications, the letters of two men offering their credentials for the position of hospital chef stand out from the others.

A Socialite, A Baby, and Blackmail: Scandal and High Society in Prohibition Era St. Louis

This article continues the Becker Brief of March 17, 2016 on the events surrounding the 1931 kidnapping of Dr. Isaac Kelley, a St. Louis area physician. During the trials of his kidnappers three years later, a St. Louis socialite was implicated in the plot to abduct Dr. Kelley. Her trail for the kidnapping was followed by accusations of illegal baby purchasing and blackmail.
Dr. Kelley models the tape-covered driving goggles.

A Doctor, A Reporter, and A Kidnapping: A Physician's Abduction in Prohibition Era St. Louis

April 20, 1931, a night which would eventually set into motion a kidnapping, a murder, the theft of a baby, and multiple trials, was appropriately dark and stormy.