Determining your location... | View access restrictions

About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy
Lateral ventricles, Vesalius De fabrica, 1543, page 608  BBML

The cell doctrine of brain function, as seen in three illustrated books, 1491-1543

We believe the earliest illustrations of the brain that can be found at Becker Library are in two books in from the 1490s: “Fasciculus medicinae, 1491” (facsimile 1988) and “Philosophia Pauperum (Philosophy for the simple),” 1496. 
Engraved title page, Aldrovandi's Monstrorum historia, 1642. BBML

From the Rare Book Collections: Aldrovandi, Ulisse. 1642. "Monstrorum Historia"

“Monstrorum Historia” is a visually stunning book on the history of monsters. It is part of a larger work, an enormous 13-volume encyclopedia on natural history.
Button, Nov 15 [1969], March on Washington to bring all the troops home now!

Moratorium, 1969 and St. Louis Doctors for Peace

With “The Vietnam War: A film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick” airing this week on PBS, it is a good time to examine the oral history of David Kennell, MD, and his archives on St. Louis Doctors for Peace. Kennell’s oral history...

In his own words: Philip M. Stimson, MD Assistant Resident at St. Louis Children's Hospital, 1916-1917

This week, as we welcomed new residents to the Medical Center, we discovered a letter in the Archives and Rare Books Division that was written by a resident 101 years ago.
Brooke General Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas

An Army Nurse Sounds Off on Basic Training and the OR, 1944

Lola Mae Baird Mathews was an operating room supervisor at Barnes Hospital from 1939-1943.
Jules Dejerine in the laboratory, 1905

Joseph Jules Dejerine and Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke: Advancing Neurology at the Dawn of the 20th Century

Joseph Jules Dejerine (1849-1917), a French neurologist whose research focused early on the anatomy and pathology of the nervous system, and later on psychoneurosis, died 100 years ago on February
Added engraved title page from Thomas Willis' Cerebri anatome, 1666.

Celebrating a Pocket-Size Cerebri Anatome by Thomas Willis at 350 Years Old: Illustrations from Becker Library’s 1666 Edition

A little over 350 years ago, Thomas Willis of Oxford, England published Cerebri Anatome (Figure 1), which would go on to become highly cited by scholars. This work on the anatomy of the brain as a vehicle for viewing the soul or mind of the creator contains several scientific firsts. One is the first appearance of the term neurology1 and another is the first illustration of the Circle of Willis or Willis' Circle,2 an arterial circle at the base of the brain, by which "full circulation to all parts of the brain can be maintained even when the carotid or vertebral arteries are blocked."3