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About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy
News, Treasures, and Musings

Advancing Sickle Cell Treatment in the Mid-20th Century

One of the great pioneers in research at Washington University School of Medicine was Lenabell McClelland Bell.

Applying to Washington University School of Medicine in 1891

Applying to medical school today is widely known to be an intensive and rigorous process. In 1891, the year Washington University first offered medical education, an applicant to the university’s medical school only needed to satisfy any one of the four admission requirements listed below:
Engraved title page, Aldrovandi's Monstrorum historia, 1642. BBML

From the Rare Book Collections: Aldrovandi, Ulisse. 1642. "Monstrorum Historia"

“Monstrorum Historia” is a visually stunning book on the history of monsters. It is part of a larger work, an enormous 13-volume encyclopedia on natural history.
Title page for Bossche’s "Historia medica"

2017 Rare Books Highlights

Becker Library’s rare book collections have had an excellent year! Richard Chole, MD, donated his fantastic collection of rare otolaryngology texts earlier this year, and we’ve recently managed to acquire two more noteworthy monographs to complement our existing collections.

Annual Display of Rare Anatomical Texts is Dec. 20

On Wednesday, Dec. 20, Becker Library’s Archives and Rare Books Division will host the Annual Display of Rare Anatomical Texts from 2 to 5 p.m. in the King Center on the library's seventh floor. The exhibition is a unique opportunity...
Evarts Graham demonstrates how the smoking apparatus was used

The Great American Smokeout

Every year on the third Thursday of November, the American Cancer Society encourages all smokers to avoid using cigarettes for 24 hours for the Great American Smokeout event. The hope is that by refraining from smoking for one single day, and instead learning more about the many health benefits of quitting for good, smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk.
Levi H. Fuson operates on a patient at Base Hospital 21 in Rouen, France.

November 1917 at Base Hospital 21

By November of 1917, the original members of Base Hospital 21 were six months into their deployment to Rouen, France. Recruited from the Washington University Medical Center, the doctors, nurses and enlisted personnel who had left St. Louis in May with great fanfare were now settling into a routine that included being severely overworked. When the unit arrived in France to assume control of a British army hospital, it became obvious they were seriously understaffed. A cohort of British personnel remained to help until American medical reinforcements could be sent, but by the start of November, the reinforcements still had not arrived.

New Exhibit: "Introducing the Book - The Title Page from 1500-1900"

How many of you take the time to look at a title page when you buy a new book? Most of the time there’s no real need to do so – we can read the book’s title and author right on the front cover. Hundreds of years ago, however, the title page played a much more important role. During the early modern period, when printed books were first becoming popular, books were usually either sold unbound or with simple paper wrappers. Therefore, the title page was responsible for both providing information about a work and luring prospective buyers.