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About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy

In her own words: Caroline Whitney

Dear Sir: - Before I left St. Louis last Spring, I spoke to you about certain aspirations of mine towards a Fellowship with the National Research Council. You may not remember the conversation, but I am taking advantage of your offer to help me if I should need advice.

The new guide to the Park J. White Papers at the Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine

Park Jerauld White was born to Sophia Banker White and Park Jerauld White in Green Ridge, Staten Island on December 31, 1891.  He entered Harvard College in 1909, after attending Staten Island Academy (Harvard College Class of 1913; 1917). 

The Impact of Leo Loeb and the new guide to the Leo Loeb Papers at the Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine.

Leo Loeb (1869-1959) was a pioneer in transplantation research beginning with his thesis required for an M.D. at the University of Zurich awarded in 1897. For his thesis, Loeb conducted skin cell transplantation using guinea pigs and he continued transplantation research until 1941.