Scholarly Publishing

Spotlight on Washington University in St. Louis: 2015-2017 Publications

As follows is a brief overview of the 2015-2017 publications produced by authors from Washington University in St. Louis using Elsevier Scopus and SciVal. Scopus is a large database of peer-reviewed literature that contains 69 million publication records representing 25,000 journals and other sources worldwide covering the Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities. SciVal  [Read more]

Scholarly Publishing

Tips to NIH Public Access Compliance: Don’t forget to check the “NIH funding” box on forms from the journal

Congratulations! Your article has been accepted to a journal. We know this is an exciting time and there are many details to manage. One key thing to remember – If NIH funding supported the work, don’t forget to check the “NIH funding” box on the publisher’s copyright form. This lets the publisher know that the  [Read more]

Scholarly Publishing

Spotlight on Washington University from SciVal: Institute for Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS)

Acknowledging your funding support on publications is a key component of responsible conduct of research but it is also a great tool to use when tracking the impact of your work. Centers and core facilities on campus work with multiple investigators; tracking funding awards can be crucial for getting accurate publication counts and insights to help  [Read more]

Scholarly Publishing

Scholarly Publishing Round-Up March 2018

Sharing of clinical trial results, the ORBIT project and scientific review are the topics for the March 2018 Round-Up. Who’s Not Sharing their Trial Results? Check out the new FDAAA TrailsTracker Tool. The tool was built by the Evidence-Based Medicine DataLab from the University of Oxford. The FDA Amendments Act 801  (FDAAA) is a law that requires certain clinical trials to  [Read more]

Scholarly Publishing

Invitation to Submit a Manuscript for Peer Review: What Should Authors Do?

Authors on campus report they are receiving emails inviting them to submit a manuscript for peer review. Some invitations may be from credible journals; others may be from unscrupulous journals seeking to exploit authors. In most instances, an invited publication is solicited by one’s peers and known colleagues, and from an established journal.

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