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About Access Restrictions to Electronic Resources

Access and use of electronic resources made available by the Becker Medical Library are governed by license agreements between the School of Medicine and publishers or third parties. Several of the electronic resources carry some restriction on their use. Access may be restricted by user location, number of concurrent users, and/or password.

In short, most people experience access limitations based on the network to which their computer is connected. Below is a quick breakdown of what can be accessed from various networks.

BJH (Limited to) SLCH (Limited to) Proxy (Remote Access) WUSM Off Campus
AccessMedicine
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
AccessMedicine
American Academy of Pediatrics Journals
Applied Clinical Informatics
Harriet Lane Handbook
Red Book Online
ScienceDirect
STAT!Ref
UpToDate Online
Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources Unrestricted Access to All Becker Resources No Access without Proxy

Color-Blindness and the Railroads

People often assume that everyone else sees the world in the same way that they do, not just figuratively but also literally – the sky is blue, the setting sun is red, the bright yellow of a

Madcap Medicine: The Life and Art of Louis Crusius, M.D.

Dr. Louis Crusius (1862-1898), the oldest of nine children of Ludwig and Emilie Crusius, was a native of Sauk City, Wisconsin. At fifteen, he became a printer’s apprentice in the newspaper office of his father who published the local German daily.
Aerial view of completed medical center, 1916

The "New" Medical Center

The creation of the “new” medical center at Washington University came about largely due to the efforts of two men: Abraham Flexner and Robert Brookings. With funding from the Carnegie Foundation, Flexner set out 1908 to visit 155 medical schools throughout the United States and Canada.
Silver Mess Cup, front

Base Hospital 21 Silver Mess Cup

This English silver “mess cup” was presented to the Officers’ Mess of Base Hospital 21 of the Washington University School of Medicine by Colonel Fred T. Murphy, Professor of Surgery, 1910-1919.